Category Archives: Science

Oil and green energy may seem like polar opposites, and in many ways they are. One causes devastating environmental destruction when extracted and burned and is set to destroy our planet’s ecological system irreversibly if we don’t stop using it. The other produces no emissions once established and could power our planet cleanly for centuries to come with far fewer ill-effects to the environment. No points for guessing which is which. However, both are buzzwords at the moment, and both have increased in popularity in the past year. At the same time, both sectors employ millions of highly-skilled workers, making both vital to the global economy and people’s livelihoods. The debate between oil and green energy is one that has gone on for decades, with many claiming one is better for the environment and others claiming the other is. It’s something that has been talked about in the media for…

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Computer science is a fast-growing discipline that is recognized as a “critical enabler” for innovation and economic growth worldwide. It is particularly relevant in sectors such as medicine, finance, manufacturing, education, energy, transportation, and communication. But despite its importance, many computer science students do not have enough exposure to the field. This can lead to students lacking knowledge of computer functions, production, and manufacturing. For instance, companies similar to ProEx can manufacture tape and reels, which can be used for the process of packaging electronic components into individual pockets of the carrier tape. The carrier tape is wound around an industry-standard reel through automation for loading onto component-placement equipment. Learning such a process can help computer science students in understanding the depth of these electronic parts. Moreover, the number of computer science students is rapidly increasing. Students learning subjects like data science, machine learning, JAVA, etc., may have to do…

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What is in a name? Often a fair bit in fact! We use names as useful shortcuts to better explain things in the natural world, from new species to comets and new inventions. But what does it take to get one of those new things named after you? There are a few approaches you can take to get something named after you and put down in the history books alongside historically important figures. I am going to suggest a few routes you could take. Find Something New If you love math, comets, and you really want something named after you, you are in the right field. Put in a lot of work to find a previously undiscovered comet, or create a new mathematical proof, and you will soon have something named after you! You can choose to that whatever you discover named after yourself. But unfortunately, this does not translate…

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With the increasingly impressive developments in machine learning and consequently, deep learning algorithms, we are seeing amazing new kinds of data modeling that is producing better-tailored results for a wider range of specific data processing requirements. With the help of DevOps and MLOps, deep learning has furthered its reach in various kinds of individuals and industries alike. From bespoke IT services to containerization through docker-based applications (you can read up OpenShift vs. Kubernetes to see how they can help your management processes), there have been massive improvements in both personal and business fronts! Nonetheless, technology has also been branching out to produce new solutions from these data models. Therefore, I am going to show you how some intelligent people are tricking deep learning algorithms into doing new things. Pretrained and Finetuned Deep Learning Models When you want to create an application that requires deep learning technologies, one option is to…

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This space will be reserved for a few of the technological advancements that have been made in the field of space exploration. From Neil Armstrong’s giant leap for mankind to man being able to explore Mars using Space Rovers. Pioneers Two brave pioneers spring to mind when you think of spaceflight. Russian Cosmonaut Uri Gagarin became the first man in space on 12 April 1961, orbiting it for 108 minutes in his Vostok 1 spacecraft. Previously only un-manned missions had been carried out. The first man-made object to land on the moon had been the Soviet Union’s Luna 2 on 13 September 1959. It was not, however, until 20 July 1969 that man arrived there in person and was able to walk its surface for the first time in history. A crew from the United States achieved it with Neil Armstrong, who uttered the famous words, “One Giant Leap for…

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We perhaps take it for granted that despite having been born with less than perfect vision, we can continue to have it corrected by lenses, or more permanently elect to have it corrected by laser eye surgery. This was not always the case. This article will explore how technology has changed in optometry. Early Lenses 13th century examples exist from Europe of handheld convex lenses that were used in the treatment of presbyopia, or vision loss that was age-related. Today, this treatment is normally wearing reading glasses as treatments are still developing for this. However, there is monovision. That presbyopia surgery option should help those suffering from presbyopia to see both distant and near objects without reading glasses. That might be worth looking into. In Italy, lenses were glass-blown and set in in leather, wood, or animal horn. The glass would be held against the face or perched upon the…

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A mystery surrounding the space around our cosmic region is unfolding thanks to evidence of supernovae found in deep-sea sediments. According to a scientific study which shows the Earth has been travelling for the 33,000 years through a cloud of faintly radioactive dust. The study suggests that these clouds could be remnants of previous supernova explosions, a powerful and super bright explosion of a start. Researchers searched through several deep-sea sediments from two different locations that date back to 33,000 years using an extremely sensitive instrument called a spectrometer. They found clear traces of the isotope iron-60, which is formed when starts die in supernova explosions. Iron-60 is radioactive and completely decays away within 15 million years, which means any iron-60 found on Earth must have been formed much later than the rest of the 4.6 billion year old earth and appeared here from nearby supernovae before settling on the…

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